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Book review: Sea of Shadows

It’s been a while since I’ve read an epic fantasy novel, YA or not. This week’s review is of Sea of Shadows by Kelley Armstrong and marks my first foray into a work by this prolific author. Not knowing Armstrong or any other works, I think probably helped me approach Sea of Shadows without any preconceptions or expectations.

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In the Forest of the Dead, where the empire’s worst criminals are exiled, twin sisters Moria and Ashyn are charged with a dangerous task. For they are the Keeper and the Seeker, and each year they must quiet the enraged souls of the damned.

Only this year, the souls will not be quieted.

Ambushed and separated by an ancient evil, the sisters’ journey to find each other sends them far from the only home they’ve ever known. Accompanied by a stubborn imperial guard and a dashing condemned thief, the girls cross a once-empty wasteland, now filled with reawakened monsters of legend, as they travel to warn the emperor. But a terrible secret awaits them at court–one that will alter the balance of their world forever.

So this blurb just about gives away the entire story. Really. No spoiler warning required because it’s all in the blurb.

I enjoyed Sea of Shadows, although I often found myself wondering why. Most of the book is spent partly with Ashyn as she bumbles through the wastes with her thief turned protector confronting monsters, and partly with Moria as she bumbles through the wastes with her obdurate guard turned friend confronting different monsters. At times, I just wanted the girls to get to court, because that’s where the secret and intrigue awaits, but it’s literally only in the last couple of chapters that the girls make it to court. Granted the ‘secret’ – aka plot twist – is pretty clever and does throw quite the curveball, but the book ends where the blurb does and left me feeling cheated and rather disappointed. I knew this was a trilogy, but I did expect more story and less traipsing through the wastes in the first installment.

Why did I like it then? The characters, or more specifically, the character interactions. The girls are superbly teemed up with boys who act often as foils and sometimes as mirrors. Ronan is a thief who challenges Ashyn’s rather black and white perspective on the world. He’s also been around the block, which makes for some funny and blush-worthy banter between him and the ever so innocent girl. Moria is the antithesis of her sister: brash, opinionated, argumentative and far more open if no less experienced in the ways of the world. Her guard is an equally opinionated warrior, and their scathing repartee (which of course develops from animosity into affection) makes for entertaining reading. I read this book for the characters and I will probably return to finish this trilogy because I have come to care deeply about this foursome.

The weak point in this book is the world-building. We have a forest of restless souls, which come back as the walking undead called shadow stalkers, and these shadow stalkers are only kept at bay by warriors of the North. If it sounds familiar, I guess that’s because GRR Martin called dibs on anything undead strolling around the North. The world also seems to be somewhat influenced by Asian culture with character names like Kitsune and Tatsu and a scene that hinted at the use of chopsticks rather than knives and forks. I really liked the Asian aspects but they seemed few and far between, with the girls – the main heroines – being described as pale, red-headed northerners. There are other characters, however, with darker skin and ’tilted’ eyes. The description of the architecture also seemed odd to me – going from pretty standard Castle Black-like villages to something that called to mind the white-washed abodes of Greece and then perhaps something resembling the Forbidden City. I’m all for a non-Western, non-European fantasy, but this felt like it couldn’t quite make up it’s mind about whether the influences were Western or Eastern. Perhaps the rest of the series will flesh out the world-building a bit more. I hope so, although I’m not sure that will save it from feeling a little derivative.

Come to think of it though, can any epic fantasy these days survive being compared to Martin or Tolkien? Some of the most cliched elements of fantasy are the reasons I love the genre!

Sea of Shadows is a highly enjoyable YA fantasy read with characters you can really care about even if the plot isn’t terribly exciting in this first book. I’m definitely going to read book 2 so Sea of Shadows scores 3.5/5 ink splats from me.

3.5 inksplats

 
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Posted by on April 21, 2015 in Reviews, Uncategorized

 

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Film Review: Interstellar

Christopher Nolan – check! Matthew McConaughey – check! Space stuff – check! Quantum mechanics – check! Epic soundtrack – check! This movie had so much going for it and I couldn’t wait to see it even though it clocked in at almost three hours. Two weeks ago, I finally got to see the film that the Internet had been buzzing about.

*Warning – There may be spoilers ahead*

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I only watched this film two weeks ago and I’m having a hard time even remembering what the story was about: dust, NASA, ghosts or aliens or something, wormholes, black holes, space – lots of space, Ellen Burstyn. This is indicative of one of the problems I had with Interstellar. It started off strong and there were interesting snippets about the world and the sort of future we had made for ourselves but no real explanation as to how the blight had come about and why leaving the planet was the only option – what other options had been explored? We never find out and to be honest I was starting to get bored. After about twenty minutes, I started browsing Facebook and checking email, letting the film run in the background. What the hell? This is Christopher Nolan! Inception and his Batman movies had me rivetted even if they were flawed and Memento I’ve watched so many times I’ve lost count, but this film struggled to hold my interest.

Finally, something happens. Is it a ghost, is it an alien? In a sort of M. Night Shyamalan moment of weirdness, Cooper finally discovers the remnants of NASA – yay, space! Nope… More stuff happens and I just wasn’t emotionally involved enough. Yes, there are some interesting parallels to the whole one-way ticket to Mars debates currently happening in certain corners of the Internet and the father-daughter moments are poignant, but I knew I was being manipulated so I didn’t really feel very much.

Space! Now we get to the good stuff! But what the actual (insert expletive)? So, this advanced civilization called ‘they’ (super original) drop a wormhole supposedly for humanity’s convenience – although how this conclusion is reached I just don’t know – near Saturn. Saturn. Two light years away. Would’ve been a heck of a lot more convenient to drop that wormhole a little closer considering ‘they’ can just manufacture wormholes where they please. Now this wormhole leads to another galaxy with supposedly, hopefully habitable planets, which will save humanity, so Cooper is tasked to go take a look and follow up with the previous space explorers. I’m down with that, but if ‘they’ are behind this and want to help humanity and can manufacture wormholes why on earth can’t they give the exact co-ordinates to the best hospitable planet straight away? It makes no sense, but then there’d be no movie without the exploration of the bad planets and all the drama that naturally ensues for more than two freaking hours! Also, the planetary system humanity has been gifted happens to have a giant black hole at its center which doesn’t make for a super hospitable environment given how black holes devour light and gravity and time. ‘They’ are starting to seem like total jerks.

Then we get into the science of Interstellar, which bandies about terms like ‘relativity’ and ‘gravity’ providing superficial explanations at best for what they think is going on, but, basically, by the time Cooper and crew have sussed out the planets and found somewhere for humanity to colonize, it’ll be too late and Earth would’ve perished because of the whole time flux thing. Again, ‘they’ are total assholes because ‘they’ must’ve known this. ‘They’ are not proving very helpful. Then stuff happens and there are waves and Anne Hathaway tears and a very weird conversation about love being some sort of transcendental force and more about gravity. (It’s starting to feel like this movie wanted a different title but Alfonso Cuarón got there first). By this time I kept checking the time, wondering how much longer there could possibly be of this movie.

Honestly, I’ve forgotten why, but there’s a math problem on Earth and they need to gather data from beyond the event horizon in the black hole to help people on Earth solve this equation and save humanity so naturally the answer is to go through the black hole because science says this is possible and is a great idea, NOT! The logic here baffles me, but hip-sounding science words like singularity are bandied about so it’s all good. Cooper and his sidekick AI’d robot TARS head into the black hole and find themselves in a tesseract (another cool sciency word) made by ‘them’ and now suddenly Cooper can communicate with his daughter across space and time because their love transcends I don’t even know what at this point. So turns out Cooper was the alien-ghost sending his daughter messages via gravity – I don’t know how gravity is the scientific explanation to this but okay – which creates a big problem with the whole space-time continuum Hollywood frequently exploits and fails to understand. Cooper also has the revelation that ‘they’ are in fact advanced humans and now that TARS has the quantum data he needs to solve the equation back home it’s all cupcakes and balloons for the future of humanity.

‘They’ presumably then save Cooper from the black hole and send him safely back to Saturn where he gets picked up by the Earth armada who are hanging out near the wormhole waiting for Anne Hathaway to give the all clear from a potentially habitable planet. Humanity has left Earth without knowing for sure that there is a habitable planet – I just don’t even. Also, more stuff about gravity and relativity and love that I just don’t care about because hallelujah this movie is over and the closing credits soundtrack is awesome.

These three hours weren’t an entire waste of time though. TARS and CASE (the on-board robots) are super awesome and are undoubtedly the best characters in this movie. Matt Damon makes an appearance and his story ARC, though limited, provides one of the more interesting moments in this film. It is super pretty too. The cinematography is outstanding and all the space stuff – when you eventually get to it – is visually spectacular.

I am not impressed with Interstellar, mostly because the story weaved quantum mechanics with quantum mysticism and didn’t seem to realize the difference between the two. This film was just too long. Had it been an hour shorter I might’ve enjoyed it more but at almost three hours of questionable science and scenes set on Earth that felt an awful lot like filler, I just couldn’t enjoy it. If you enjoy more philosophical, mystical approaches to science fiction then I strongly recommend Mr Nobody or even Sunshine. I know I’m in the minority having read other reviews and seeing the IMDB ratings for this, but Interstellar gets 1.5/5 ink splats from me.

1.5 splats

 
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Posted by on March 17, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

Film Review: Mr Nobody

I can’t believe it’s taken me this long to post a review about what is likely my favourite science fiction film ever, so here it is…

*There be mild spoilers ahead*

mr_nobody This movie took my breath away, and continues to do so every time I watch it, which isn’t nearly as often as I would like given it’s almost three-hour run time. The entire film hinges on a single existential concept, that of choice and that in the moment before we make a choice, everything is possible. Nemo – our protagonist – is introduced to us as a very old man on his death bed in a futuristic city where he is a fascination being the last human being to die of old age. Through a series of interview questions, Nemo gradually starts to relieve and reveal his complicated life story, which hinges on a single moment in his childhood. As a kid, Nemo is presented with an impossible choice – to stay with his father or go with his mother when his parents split (a horrific choice no parent should force a child to make) – and because he is unable to choose, everything becomes possible. This is where the movie spins out into the tangential and convoluted, dipping into quantum theory and various structuralist and deconstructionist philosophies as we follow the various paths Nemo’s life might’ve, could’ve, did and didn’t take. Some lead to happy marriage, others to emotional instability, disfigurement and even homelessness, yet another leads Nemo to Mars! I knew Jared Leto could act after seeing him in Requiem for a Dream and as Mark Chapman in Chapter 27 (this all prior to his Oscar-winning performance in Dallas Buyer’s Club), but he excels in Mr Nobody by playing not one version of the character, but no less than 12 unique iterations. It is a wonder to watch the actor realize each version of Nemo as life choices mold and shape who he becomes. Of course, these various life trajectories becoming increasingly complicated and interwoven, becoming entangled with each other as Nemo’s choices continue to change and distort reality. If you’re looking for an action-orientated sci-fi flick, look elsewhere. This film is higher grade, requiring constant concentration – and it is not a short film – and probably a second or third viewing to catch all the subtleties and nuances present not only in the obvious story, but happening in the background thanks to some truly fantastic cinematography. This movie is at times contemporary romance, YA love story, sci-fi action (with some amazing scenes on Mars), sci-fi thriller, high drama and family saga. All these threads weave together to create an epic tapestry that is difficult to digest all at once. I strongly suggest multiple viewings of this film. It’s so beautiful with a stunning soundtrack, and so sincerely acted by Leto who transforms physically and psychologically between the roles so effortlessly, that I don’t think setting aside three hours for this film more than once is such a tall order. Mr Nobody is quite easily my favorite film of all time and I strongly recommend it to those who enjoy sophisticated science fiction, which delves beyond the superficial aesthetic of a dystopian future. 5/5 ink splats for this one of course! 5 inksplats

 
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Posted by on January 6, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

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A review of NIGHT WITCHES by L. J. Adlington

Hi everyone, I’m new to the blog *waves* Thank you Dave for inviting me over to review some super cool speculative fiction. I’ll mostly be reviewing YA books, but I’ll also review the odd film or two. I have a quirky taste in books and films so I hope my reviews will introduce you to lesser known but no less awesome SF/F stories.

 

About me in a nutshell:

My name is Suzanne and I’m a tattooed story-teller from South Africa, but I currently live in Finland where I hibernate during the long winters writing, reading and watching everything under the speculative fiction banner – except horror, because I’m a wuss. I have a peanut butter addiction and a shibu inu called Lego. You can find out more about me and my books at my website. And instead of giving you a picture of my face, I thought I’d show you the cover of my forthcoming YA novel, I HEART ROBOT, because this cover is so much prettier ;)

You can also hang out with me on Twitter or Facebook if you’d prefer.

 

And now for the review…

A supernatural thriller-romance set in an all-girl teenage bomber-pilot regiment, combining witchcraft and legend.

TWO NATIONS AT WAR. ONE GIRL CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE. Rain Aranoza is a teenage bomber-pilot from Rodina, a nation of science and fact ruled by the all knowing Aura, where the belief in witches or any type of superstition is outlawed. Rain’s regiment is made up of only teenage girls and their role is vital to the war effort against the Crux, a nation of faith and belief, where nature and God are celebrated and worshipped.

But Rain is struggling with another battle. She’s always had a sense that her nature is different from everyone else’s, and that a dormant power threatens to burst out of her.

When she encounters a young Scrutiner she falls in love with him, but is torn between what she has been taught is right, and what feels right. As her understanding of her latent power grows, the enemy threatens both her friends and her love. She can no longer ignore the power but she must choose how she uses it … But what will she lose in the process?

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When I reached the end of this novel, four words came to mind: Brilliant! Amazing! Original! Enthralling!
 
To be honest, I didn’t know what to expect when I picked this up at the library. The cover immediately caught my attention (hooray for a person of colour being on the cover!) and then that blurb. Teenage bomber pilots? Sign me up! This book was astonishingly good, the perfect blend of science and fantasy starring a sympathetic MC who I adored. That said, it was the secondary characters who stole the show here, and one of the secondary characters was even genderqueer.
 
This book scored lots of points for diversity. What really had me captivated though wasn’t the MC, or the cool planes, or the love interest with tattooed eyelids (creepy and awesome), but rather the world. The author weaves a rich tapestry that pits religion against science, humanity against artificial intelligence, and nature against machine using appropriate vocabulary and teenage slang born from the fantastic world the characters live in. This all added a most authentic feel to the book and had me fully immersed in the story world from cover to cover.
 
What sealed the 5 ink splat deal for me was finding out this story was inspired by the real night witches: all-female fighter pilots from the Soviet Union who became a rather formidable force during WWII. The fact that this bit of history is woven into the story, including thematic material gleaned from Stalinist philosophy, added an extra dimension to the book, one which I found fascinating and terrifying, especially considering the YA demographic for which this book is intended. It was a brave move by the author and one she executed flawlessly.
 
I strongly recommend this book to anyone looking for a strong YA science fantasy featuring diverse characters in an incredibly well-constructed world. This book gets 5/5 ink-splats from me! Right, I’m off to find more books by this author.

 

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Review: Lo’Life Book 1 – Romeo Spikes by Joanne Reay (Titan Books)

The Blurb:

”The tragedy of suicide is not death. It is what dies within us whilst we live.”

Working the Homicide squad, Alexis Bianco believes she’s seen every way a life can be taken. Then she meets the mysterious Lola and finds out she’s wrong. More weapon than woman, Lola pursues a predator with a method of murder like no other.

The Tormenta.

If you think you’ve never encountered Tormenta, think again. You’re friends with one. Have worked for one. Maybe even fallen in love with one.

They walk amongst us—looking like us, talking like us. Coercing our subconscious with their actions.

Like the long-legged beauty that seduces the goofy geek only to break his heart, causing him to break his own neck in a noose. Or the rockstar, whose every song celebrates self-harm, inspiring his devoted fans to press knives to their own throats. The pusher who urges the addict toward one more hit, bringing him a high from which he’ll never come down. The tyrannical boss, crushing an assistant’s spirit until a bridge jump brings her low.

We call it a suicide. Tormenta call it a score, their demonic powers allowing them to siphon off the unspent lifespan of those who harm themselves.

To Bianco, being a cop is about right and wrong. Working with Lola is about this world and the next…and maybe the one after that. Because everything is about to change. The coming of a mighty Tormenta is prophesied, a dark messiah known as the Mosca.

To stop him, Bianco and Lola must fight their way through a cryptic web of secret societies and powerful legends to crack an ancient code that holds the only answer to the Mosca’s defeat. If this miscreant rises before they can unmask him, darkness will reign, and mankind will fall in a storm of suicides.

Nobody’s safe. Everyone’s a threat.

I don’t read much in Urban Fantasy, to be honest.

I think it’s because there is such a massive emphasis placed on certain things that always seem prevalent in the genre, which, unfortunately, bring it closer to Paranormal Romance. There are plenty of authors I’ve yet to read, and the ones that I have delved into (Kate Griffin, Seanan McGuire and Chuck Wendig, to name a few) have impressed me.

Urban Fantasy has to, in my opinion, succeed at the following:

1) it must be set, largely, in an urban environment. The genre isn’t Country Fantasy. 2) There must be sufficient secondary world-building to make the reader miss the urban environment, and vice versa. 3) The magic has to be interesting and different – Kate Griffin and Chuck Wendig succeed massively at this. Among, of course the other necessities, such as good character growth, and interesting plot, etc.

When I first set to reading ‘Romeo Spikes’ I struggled to get into the book – not because it was badly written (it isn’t), or because it wasn’t interesting (it is), but because it was different. It’s one of the ways that I know I’ll enjoy a book – the difficulty of the read added to the certainty that I want to read the book.

‘Romeo Spikes’ doesn’t have fairies, or fae. There’s no Celtic-feel to it, and neither does it have a Norse flavour. Joanne manages to create a world that is at once surprising as it is interesting, bringing in a Biblical-mythology layer that makes her world fresh and captivating, which allows the characters to react and change as they should in a world they don’t know much about. The exploration of the world, as a reader, was one of the highlights of the book, for sure.

Character-wise, Joanne does jump around a bit, and most of the time it works – the reader will experience different perspectives (on both sides of the novel’s central conflict), and in particular, Bianco and Lola’s character-arcs are really well-written, engaging and attention-holding, with plenty of little clues along the way that will tug and push the reader along as they wonder just where these two stand. The Tormenta are interesting creations, but that’s all I’ll say – read the book and discover them for yourself. :-)

One aspect of the novel that tripped me up was the time-change in some of the chapters – there is very little or no warning, and I found myself having to re-read the chapter’s beginning to get my bearings again, because the plot had suddenly jumped into the past. This interrupted the novel’s otherwise great flow. But that’s my only real problem with the book. :-)

The world-building is great, and I’m sure many other readers will be left thinking about “real” or Historical events and the cool spin Joanne put on them. The characters are all interesting and well-fleshed out, and the book’s climax is a real surprise! And what “magic” there is in the book doesn’t overwhelm or confuse. Joanne’s style has a great flow and her descriptions are crisp, colourful, atmospheric and suitably brutal (at times).

If you’re looking for Urban Fantasy that doesn’t follow the conventional rules of the Genre (which no book should do, but you know what I’m getting at) and also builds an interesting new world, then Romeo Spikes should definitely be added to your shelf. I’m looking forward to the next book! :-)

8 / 10

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To order copies of the book, check out the following links: Amazon US, Amazon UK, Book Depository, Exclusive Books. You can also read an excerpt from the novel here, and for more info on Joanne, check out her page on Simon and Schuster here. Don’t forget to browse Titan’s website – plenty more good reading to be had!

Until tomorrow,

Be EPIC!

 
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Posted by on June 18, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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2013 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 16,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 6 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Double Review: The Dragon Factory & The King of Plagues by Jonathan Maberry (Joe Ledger Series)

It’s been a while since I’ve read the first Joe Ledger super-adventure, Patient Zero, and as you can read in this review, I loved it. :-) It did set the bar extremely high for sequels, and I was really scared of being let down – after all, how do you top a hectically fast-paced, explosively brutal and supremely imaginative novel like Patient Zero?

Well, I don’t have a clue – but Jonathan Maberry does.

The Dragon Factory

As I began with The Dragon Factory I was a bit stunned at how it began – it’s one of those novel-openings that shows the main protagonist in extreme danger – but I thought it was very cleverly done because I actually did worry that Joe would bite the big one in the novel. After the massive dangers he faced in Patient Zero I was sitting there thinking, “Dude, I know you’re good, but jeez, this might be a bit much for even you to deal with!”

At the end of that scene the novel then launches with Joe’s POV chapters, interspersed with POV chapters from a variety of other characters, most central to the tale, others not. One of the very difficult things that a writer sometimes does is not only switching POV but types of POV – Joe’s POVs in the books are First-Person, while the other characters are Third-Person, and it’s a risky venture, swapping POVs like that, because the reader might just be jarred out of the book; Jonathan managed these POV-switches so well that the entire read was practically seamless, so no jarring. :-) Also, Jonathan sets the scene at the beginning of each chapter by giving the reader the place, date and time in which that scene takes place, just in case there is any confusion. So the book’s structure was well thought out and it flowed seamlessly from scene to scene, which helped the pace of the novel pick up when the action began shredding walls and ceilings and stuff. :-)

That’s another aspect of Jonathan’s novels that impress the hell out of me – the pace of these things is absolutely incredible! I first started with The Dragon Factory by listening to the audio-book, but audio books need to be savoured and enjoyed, i.e. you need to be relaxed when you listen to one – and the thing is, Jonathan doesn’t let you relax. In fact, I found myself biting my nails and pacing up and down and punching the air and uttering short and very un-manly squeals when I read the novel. Took me three days, give or take a couple of hours, and at the end of it I was breathless and amazed. :-)

The book’s action scenes are beyond hard-hitting and thrilling – Jonathan puts his characters through so many wringers that a new plural for ‘wringer’ needs to be invented, and his characters are affected by this: they get battered, beaten, struggle to understand the morality of the lives they lead, etc. They don’t just reload and keep on blasting. The book’s plot is as interesting, if not more, than that of Patient Zero, and bigger in scope, too, though the shadow of Patient Zero is there – its effects still felt by all the characters who survived through the events that followed Joe Ledger’s joining the DMS. And the climax is, well, shattering – certainly left me quiet for a long while, while at the same time itching to read the next Joe Ledger novel.

There are many ways to judge how good a novel is, and one of those many ways is the ending – for The Dragon Factory’s climax to hit me as hard as it did and still leave me foaming at the mouth for the next novel means that it’s a damned good novel; Jonathan Maberry has become my own high watermark of Speculative Thriller excellence. :-)

So, 9 / 10 for an insanse, highly enjoyable and utterly unputdownable novel!

To order your copies of The Dragon Factory, click here for Amazon US, here for Amazon UK, and here if you’re in South Africa.

The King of Plagues

King of Plagues was an extremely clever novel, in many ways – even got me thinking about thriller writers and whether they might constitute a threat to America’s national security! ;-) (Seriously, you’ll have to read it to understand what I mean by that.)

The novels opens some months after the end of The Dragon Factory and there are many repercussions that the characters are still dealing with – which already impressed me because of the real sense of continuity that this series has. The scope of the novel is a bit smaller than in The Dragon Factory but this works for the novel, and through the read I came to agree with this risk that Jonathan took – after all, sequels should be bigger and better than the previous books, but that doesn’t always have to do with length, events, action, etc. The ‘bigger and better’ can also mean that the characters get a tighter focus, so that the conflicts they feel and the shit they go through seems as hectic -if not more- than the bombs exploding around them and the bullets zip past them.

A very surprising character returns in The King of Plagues, and as soon as I realized who this character was I knew that all manner of fireworks were going to explode – it’s also the moment that the novel really kicks into high gear, and because it happened early enough in the novel, well, I finished the book in two days or something – yep, it was that cool. :-) One of the villains in the novel (yep, you read that right – Joe and the DMS faced truly insane odds in this book) was handled so well that when the moment of revelation came (regarding who that character actually was) it was a punch to the gut – really awesomely done! And there was also one very intriguing character who I really hope to see more of – his role was small, but he’s damned memorable (when you meet him you’ll probably agree with me).

The King of Plagues also struck me as being a pretty topical book, because it didn’t have anything extravagantly cool like zombies or genetically modified freaks in it: the novel takes a pretty dark and alarming look at fanatics, insanity and the terrifying willingness of man to hurt man, whether because of a post in an online forum or because of not actually caring enough. But I never once thought that Jonathan was preaching, which I thank him for. :-)

So, is it the best book of the series so far? Yep, I think so. A helluva read, as fast-paced and exciting as I know Jonathan can be, as imaginative as ever, and totally cements Joe Ledger’s position as the most kickass asskicker in Thrillers. Die Hard and 24 just wouldn’t be able to keep up with or stop this man, that’s for sure!

9 / 10

To order your copies of The King of Plagues, click here for Amazon US, here for Amazon UK, and here if you’re in South Africa.

And head over to Jonathan’s site – this post has info on the latest Joe Ledger thriller, Assassin’s Code, and all you need to know about the Joe Ledger series of novels and short stories. :-)

Also, check this out – snatched it (with his permission) from Jonathan – I think it’s AWESOME:

And I absolutely cannot wait -although I’ll have to, being in South Africa- to read Assassin’s Code! Here’s the awesome cover:

Until next time,

Be EPIC!

 
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Posted by on April 13, 2012 in Reviews, Uncategorized

 

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