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Author Archives: Dave-Brendon de Burgh

About Dave-Brendon de Burgh

I play guitar, write short stories, busy writing my first fantasy novel, I work in a book shop, I collect comics, and I'm a huge Star Wars fan. :-)

Days of the Dead Blog Tour – Guest Post: Gail Z Martin

Hey everyone, Dave here! :-)

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It’s that time of the year again – Gail Z Martin, author of many novels -including those that make the Chronicles of the NecromancerThe Ascendant Kingdoms Saga, The Fallen Kings CycleDeadly Curiosities and plenty of short stories- is preparing us all for a massive 2015 by taking over the blogosphere with guest-posts, giveaways, excerpts and much more!

So, let’s welcome Gail once again, with a guest post exploring characters… ;-)

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What Characters Do Between Books By Gail Z. Martin

Have you ever wondered what characters do on their days off?

What I mean is, do you ever think about what characters might be doing between books, when the author isn’t looking?

Those of us who live with multiple casts of characters in our heads think about strange things like this. Often, we are faced with characters who might be ready to mutiny on a moment’s notice if they thought it would get them a new book contract or a series of short stories.

Really, it’s not easy being in character limbo. And to tell the truth, that’s not how I think of my characters in between the tales I tell.

For example, my Chronicles of the Necromancer series is on hiatus as I write the Ascendant Kingdoms Saga. I have six more books I plan to write in the world of the Winter Kingdoms, but there is a natural seventeen-year break in the action in the books, and it was a good resting place for me to go off and do some other projects for a while.

That doesn’t mean the characters are resting on their laurels.

In my mind’s eye, I can tune in and see what my characters are up to while they wait for their next book. In my Chronicles of the Necromancer series, King Martris Drayke and his queen, Kiara of Isencroft are busy chasing two young boys, one with special magical needs, while rebuilding two kingdoms—Margolan and Isencroft—torn by war, famine, plague, and invasion.

Meanwhile, Lord Jonmarc Vahanian and his wife, Carina, are busy with twin girls, and Jonmarc must juggle the demands of his role as Lord of Dark Haven against his responsibilities as Champion to Queen Berwyn and her consort, Gethin of Eastmark. In Dhasson, newly-crowned King Jair struggles to lead his kingdom after the death of his father while grieving the loss of his wife and trying to raise a son who is both the rightful heir to the crown and the next shaman-chief of the nomadic Sworn.

Those are just a few of the characters readers got to know in the series, but as I go through the list, I can tell you how the others are doing, what their recent triumphs and trials have been, and what’s next for them.

From a storytelling perspective, these character-years aren’t important to chronicle because they fall between the big events. They’re the normal time, the breath between the storms. Yet for the characters themselves, the time is filled with personally momentous occasions as children grow, kingdoms rebuild, communities knit back together. The business of waging peace isn’t as exciting as conducting war, but it is demanding and busy, just the same. And even my characters know in their hearts that the good times must also come to an end someday…

My Days of the Dead blog tour runs through October 31 with never-before-seen cover art, brand new excerpts from upcoming books and recent short stories, interviews, guest blog posts, giveaways and more! Plus, I’ll be including extra excerpt links for stories and books by author friends of mine. And, a special 50% off discount from Double-Dragon ebooks! You’ve got to visit the participating sites to get the goodies, just like Trick or Treat! Details here:

www.AscendantKingdoms.com

Trick or Treat: Enjoy an excerpt from The Sworn, Book One in my Fallen Kings Cycle here: http://www.ascendantkingdoms.com/books/the-fallen-kings-cycle/the-sworn/the-sworn-chapter-one/

And a bonus excerpt from Ice Forged, Book One in my Ascendant Kingdoms Saga here: http://www.ascendantkingdoms.com/books/the-ascendant-kingdoms-saga/ice-forged/an-excerpt-from-ice-forged-book-one-in-the-ascendant-kingdoms-saga/

And a second bonus excerpt from Raider’s Curse, the first of my Jonmarc Vahanian Adventures short stories here: http://www.ascendantkingdoms.com/short-stories-and-more/the-jonmarc-vahanian-adventures/raiders-curse/excerpt-from-raiders-curse/

***

I’ve never regretted letting Gail take over the blog, and this post is a prime example why- always interesting and illuminating! Don’t forget to check out the full list of celebrations as listed on Gail’s official site; there is a massive amount of things going on! :-)

Many thanks to Gail for writing this excellent guest post, and for coordinating this post along with Gemma at Orbit – I’m definitely looking forward to the next Days of the Dead, as I’m sure you are!

Until next time,

Be EPIC!

P.S. You wanna see something EPIC? Follow this link. ;-)

 
 

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Short Film Spotlight: Merv – Directed by Matt Inns

Hey everyone, hope you’re all well. :-)

Please take a look at this great post-apocalyptic SF short film – Matt Inns got in contact and asked me if I would help to get the word out about it, and after watching and enjoying it I knew I had to. :-)

Great, eh? A fun soundtrack that perfectly fits the tale – great acting, especially when the actors are still wearing their masks, plus a great set and some cool filming all combine to make this a fun, memorable short film. :-)

Looking forward to more  from Matt!

Be EPIC!

 
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Posted by on October 27, 2014 in Short Film, Spotlight

 

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Review: No Return by Zachary Jernigan

Hey everyone, hope you’re all well. :-)

It’s been a while since I posted a review, I know, but I’ve been focusing on writing my second novel and time is always a problem! But I’m back with a review of the first novel set in the World of Jeroun – No Return.

This novel is brilliant. The world of Jeroun is incredible and terrifying – a world where the skins of a dead race can be used for power and protection; where mages use their magic to enter into the planet’s orbit; where a god looks down on Jeroun and wrestles with a decision that could mean the end of everything and everyone.

There is so much going on in this novel! As a writer I was astounded by how much Zachary managed to pour into this tale – as with Erikson’s massive narratives, the myriad stories taking place on Jeroun are all memorable and intriguing, adding not only a sense of vast time and history to the world but also managing to echo in the thoughts of the characters, giving them even more flesh and emotion. The people of Jeroun are inherently terrified of their world and the god above them, and how this terror and stubbornness exists alongside the excellent world-building is truly something sublime to explore.

But Zachary’s characters are the stars, here – Vedas, Churls, Berun, Ebn, Pol and even Adrash shine in each chapter they appear in. Vedas seems to be the lodestone of the narrative, but really only when taking the climax into consideration, but each of the others also play very significant roles throughout the tale, managing to stand on their own, for their own unique reasons. I’m actually terrified of what some of them could achieve – and here I’ll make another comparison to Erikson: as when a particularly powerful mage in the Malazan world unveils his or her warren or warrens and the reader is astounded at the level of power and capacity for destruction, the same applies here. Psychologically, these characters are incredibly complicated, and how some of them interact with each other gives the novel its heart and emotional centre. Zachary manages to explore a great variety of subjects through his characters, another reason why this novel works on many levels.

In fact, I want to re-read it before the next book, Shower of Stones, is released – not to refresh my memory, but to learn as much as I can from Zachary’s writing – he has, alongside Steven Erikson, become a writer I know I will learn a lot from. But forget about that – No Return is at once a twisted, dirty-mirror echo of the kinds of fantasy that has come before it, and also something new, bold and visionary. Hell of a read.

10 / 10

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Check out Zachary’s site for all the info you’ll need regarding how and where to order, as well as more information about his short stories (I’ll be reviewing Bottom of the Sea next) and his other work.

Until next time,

Be EPIC!

 
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Posted by on October 1, 2014 in Reviews

 

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Guest Review: Zodiac Station by Tom Harper (Reviewed by Devlin Chase)

Hey everyone! Yep, this is he first of hopefully many guest reviews that I’ll be posting on the blog. :-)

Devlin Chase is a good friend and fellow author, and Paranormal Romance fans will recognize her as the author of the Vengeful Elements series. :-)

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Here’s her review of Tom Harper’s Zodiac Station:

First off, let me say that I love a good whodunnit. I’m also a fan of science and, when the two can come together to thrill and exhilarate, I’m hooked from the first page to the last. Tom Harper’s Zodiac Station has all of that in spades.

US Coast Guard Ice Breaker Terra Nova has stopped in the ice of the Arctic to allowed on-board scientists to conduct some experiments on the ice when a figure appears out of the snow and wind, wearing a jacket not his own and which has a bullet hole in it. Suffering the effects of travelling alone on the ice for miles, the man says his name is Tom Anderson, recent arrival at Zodiac Station and the sole survivor of a terrible accident. As other survivors are found it appears that Tom Anderson might not be telling the truth and a killer may be lurking on the ship. Everyone at Zodiac Station has secrets it seems and some are worth killing for.

The story is told in narratives from the point of view of the captain of the ship, Tom Anderson and, as they arrive, the remaining survivors. There are so many correlations between the stories that, when you realise that something is amiss in each man’s story, the web of lies becomes almost breathtaking in both simplicity and impact. Piece-by-piece an entirely different picture emerges, one which will have you turning the pages ever faster as you search for the answer to the captain’s question “What is out there?

I enjoyed Zodiac Station immensely, especially the melding of roller-coaster thriller with hard science and the overwhelming sociological and environmental impacts of working and living in such inhospitable conditions. Mr Harper kept the pace going at breakneck speed while managing to reveal subtle clues along the way. Coupled with this is a lot of revealing information about the future of oil exploration and what the consequences are of working in areas which are not subject to the laws of any government.

Thought-provoking, exciting and – simply put – a damn good read, Zodiac Station is a must for fans of Scott Mariani, Andy McDermott or James Rollins. I hazard a guess that Tom Harper might be topping my favourites list very soon.

As an extra, check out Polar Vortex, a free e-book short story released by Random House to celebrate the release of Zodiac Station.

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To order copies of Zodiac Station, check out the following links: Amazon US, Amazon UK and Exclusive Books.

For more info on Devlin, check out her website, her Smashwords page, her Facebook page, and add her on Goodreads.

Until next time,

Be EPIC!

 
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Posted by on September 12, 2014 in Guest Reviews

 

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Review: A Fury of Aces: Book 2 – Crystal Venom by Steve Wheeler

I’m a big fan of intelligent, innovative Space Opera, and I knew I had found something cool when I read Steve’s first ‘Aces’ novel, Burnt Ice. I’m pleased to say that Crystal Venom continues to deliver!

The characters from Burnt Ice are back, and are thrust into even more danger and intrigue; the conspiracies and threats they went up against in the first book are revealed to be much more far-reaching, and Steve does a great job of not only dropping hints in every chapter but also in keeping the reader guessing as to who the ‘enemy’ is.

Marko, the principle character from Burnt Ice, is challenged and tested in this book, too – not only does he have to deal with the aftermath of what he and his fellow crew members went through prior to Crystal Venom, but also his growing stature within the group, being a ‘parent’, as well as being a ‘celebrity’ – Marko’s characterization is deeper in this book, which sets the scene nicely for the person he may or may not become in book 3, and his growth affects his fellow characters, as well as the other way round. There are plenty of surprises in this book, particularly concerning the paths of Marko’s friends and loved-ones.

World-building-wise, Steve expands on the universe he introduced in Burnt Ice, but not too much – while there are organizations that are still shrouded in mystery and questions, much is revealed of others , letting the reader occupy a much better position from which to ‘place’ themselves in the tale and understand the different factions. And once again Steve makes all the tech as interesting and cool as in book 1, not only letting the tech service the story but taking the reader through the evolution of the tech as the characters do more with what they have.

There’s plenty of good Space Opera out there, and Steve’s series sit comfortably among them – highly recommended! :-)

8 / 10

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Order Burnt Ice from Amazon for your Kindle and in paperback.

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Order Crystal Venom from Amazon for your Kindle and in paperback. And check out the Fury of Aces page on Facebook – Steve has been building models of the ships and vehicles from his series and they are definitely must-see’s! :-)

Until next time,

Be EPIC!

 
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Posted by on September 5, 2014 in Reviews

 

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The Legacy Blog Tour – Review: The Legacy by Melissa Delport (Tracey McDonald Publishers)

Morning! Hope you’re all well and ready for the weekend! :-)

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Today is my slot on the massive blog tour organized by Tracey McDonald for the first novel in Melissa’s trilogy. :-) Melissa is a fellow South African author living in Kwa-Zulu Natal, a wife and mother of three kids, but that hasn’t stopped her from writing, and writing well, at that.

Here’s the blurb for The Legacy:

World War Three lasted twelve days. Twelve days was all it took for mankind to devastate the planet and almost eradicate the human race. No victor emerged from the ashes and billions lost their lives.

We survivors lived through the bleakest of winters. A primal existence became the new order, and the little that remained of our humanity hung in the balance.

Then one man stood up and changed the world. I believed, as did everyone else, that he was the hero of our time, the man who had saved us from our own demise. His name is Eric Dane and he is the President of the New United States of America. 

He is also my husband, and my greatest enemy.

I grew up oblivious to the truth, until my father found me when I was nineteen years old. He told me about the many horrifying facts that our new leader kept hidden from us. And he told me that beyond the borders the Resistance grew and fought for freedom from the oppression that Eric Dane had imposed on us.

My name is Rebecca Davis. I am twenty-six years old, and in me the Resistance has found the ultimate weapon.

***

Now, I haven’t read much in the Dystopian genre, mainly because I write Epic Fantasy, Science Fiction and Horror (so I read in the genres that I write), and also because there’s so much Dystopian fiction being written for Young Adults – which I’ve got absolutely nothing against. My reading tastes just lie in a different direction. So when I began reading The Legacy I was expecting another YA Dystopian tale along the lines of The Hunger Games (watched the movies, haven’t read the books), and boy, was I pleasantly surprised! The Legacy is aimed at a mature readership, so parents might want to give the book a read first before letting their kids at it.

Not being constrained by the limits of YA, Melissa was able to really delve into the characters and world of the book. These are adults fighting a war, after all, and war isn’t pretty.

The main character of the novel, Rebecca, is a wonderful addition to the ranks of Strong Female Characters – she’s highly intelligent, motivated, passionate, and focused. We meet her as a teenager, getting a glimpse into the life she was living before she became part of the Resistance against Eric Dane and the New United States of America; her father disappeared at the onset of the Nuclear War and she’s had to grow up in a radically changed world without her father and with a family not her own. And she’s happy and leads a good life, until events focus on her and force her to make a decision that will change not only her life but the lives of hundreds, if not thousands, of others.

From the onset the reader knows that Rebecca has hidden depths, but the author doesn’t show all her cards at once – instead, information is revealed at key points, not only advancing the plot but adding more layers to Rebecca’s character. None of it came across as forced or contrived, and the journey of discovering Rebecca and the world she lives in is pulled off effortlessly and with respect to the reader.

There are many other characters in the novel that shine – members of the Resistance take centre stage alongside Rebecca, fulfilling their various roles well, while also building a collection of threads that all lead back to Rebecca, and before the climax of the novel begins the reader knows exactly where the characters stand and where the plot is headed – at least, I thought I did, but Melissa still managed to throw a couple of interesting surprises my way.

The world-building of the novel was pulled off well, too – there is a reason for everything, especially the new government and the Resistance. For example, I still don’t know what happened in The Hunger Games that so radically changed society to the levels shown in the movies – it’s just a fact of the story that I was forced to accept. Melissa, though, explains what happened to the world and how someone like Eric Dane could rise to take such a prominent place in it.

And what Melissa also does is write great action! There’s plenty of Bond-like subterfuge in the novel (Rebecca leads two lives, after all), sneaking around and such, but when the characters are forced into hand-to-hand combat it’s pretty evident that Melissa put a lot of thought into how the characters moved, attacked and defended. There’s a completely awesome side to the combat, regarding what some of the characters can do, but I’m not going to spoil it for you – suffice it to say that Melissa successfully melded Dystopian with a certain genre-craze that has controlled the box office for a couple of years now… :-)

Regarding the personal relationships between the characters, Melissa manages to make the various relationships both believable and heartfelt; obviously there’s more of a focus on Rebecca than the other characters, but the emotional depth of the book impressed me. Also, Melissa teaches Stephanie Meyer just how to write a believable complicated romance – totally believable and entertaining. :-)

All in all, The Legacy is a better tale, in my opinion, than The Hunger Games could ever hope to be, and is an excellent example of the kind of storytelling promise South African writers have. Melissa has written an entertaining, engaging and thoughtful tale full of intelligent, brave characters, excellent action, great world-building and a great respect and understanding of Dystopian fiction. Highly recommended!

9 / 10

Cover - The Legacy

The Legacy is available throughout South Africa at Exclusive Books branches and can also be ordered online (paperback and EPUB) – it’s also available via Amazon (Kindle and paperback), Amazon UK (Kindle and paperback), and from Barnes & Noble.

Photo - Melissa Delport LR

To connect with Melissa, check out her official website here and the official website for the Legacy Trilogy here; you can also check out The Legacy Book Club on Facebook, add the book on Goodreads and check out her publisher’s website here.

Be EPIC!

 
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Posted by on August 1, 2014 in Blog Tour, Reviews

 

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Blog-Tour and Guest Post: Zeus is Dead by Michael G. Munz (Booktrope Publishing)

Hi everyone!

This post is a day late, apologies for that! :-( We’ve been moving into our first house and we hardly have a kitchen, never mind an internet connection. :-) That being said, here we go:

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Zeus is Dead – A Monstrously Inconvenient Adventure by Michael G Munz.

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Title: Zeus is Dead: A Monstrously Inconvenient Adventure

Author: Michael G. Munz

Genre: Contemporary Mythological Fantasy

Release date: July 21st, 2014

Publisher: Booktrope Publishing

Length: 446 pages (paperback)

The gods are back. Did you myth them?

You probably saw the press conference. Nine months ago, Zeus’s murder catapulted the Greek gods back into our world. Now they revel in their new temples, casinos, and media empires—well, all except Apollo. A compulsive overachiever with a bursting portfolio of godly duties, the amount of email alone that he receives from rapacious mortals turns each of his days into a living hell.

Yet there may be hope, if only he can return Zeus to life! With the aid of Thalia, the muse of comedy and science fiction, Apollo will risk his very godhood to help sarcastic TV producer Tracy Wallace and a gamer-geek named Leif—two mortals who hold the key to Zeus’s resurrection. (Well, probably. Prophecies are tricky buggers.)

Soon an overflowing inbox will be the least of Apollo’s troubles. Whoever murdered Zeus will certainly kill again to prevent his return, and avoiding them would be far easier if Apollo could possibly figure out who they are.

Even worse, the muse is starting to get cranky.

Discover a world where reality TV heroes slay actual monsters and the gods have their own Twitter feeds: Zeus Is Dead: A Monstrously Inconvenient Adventure!

About the Author:

An award-winning writer of speculative fiction, Michael G. Munz was born in Pennsylvania but moved to Washington State in 1977 at the age of three. Unable to escape the state’s gravity, he has spent most of his life there and studied writing at the University of Washington.

Michael developed his creative bug in college, writing and filming four exceedingly amateur films before setting his sights on becoming a novelist. Driving this goal is the desire to tell entertaining stories that give to others the same pleasure as other writers have given to him. He enjoys writing tales that combine the modern world with the futuristic or fantastic.

Michael has traveled to three continents and has an interest in Celtic and Classical mythology. He also possesses what most “normal” people would likely deem far too much familiarity with a wide range of geek culture, though Michael prefers the term geek-bard: a jack of all geek-trades, but master of none–except possibly Farscape and Twin Peaks.

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Here’s a guest post by Michael. :-)

Hi everyone! It’s great to be here on Dave Brendon’s Fantasy & Sci-Fi Blog. (I mean, ya know, figuratively. I’m not actually here in the Internet. Probably not, anyway. There’s the tiniest chance I’m somewhere in here battling the Master Control Program.) In honor of the recent release of my comedic fantasy novel Zeus Is Dead: A Monstrously Inconvenient Adventure, Dave has asked me to talk about my writing process.

Some writers like to grab the reins of an idea or character that interests them, dig in the twin spurs of creativity and caffeine, and see where it takes them. They ride, sometimes finding glorious vistas, sometimes getting lost in a ravine, and often both. If they’re lucky, it’ll carry them directly to the stars. Or they might ram into a brick wall that shatters their mount to pieces. That’s the first draft. Then they take the reins again and, now that they’ve mapped the terrain during that first wild ride, plot a more perfect course to reach the vistas and avoid the ravines. This often involves a great deal of revising.

Stephen King likes this particular method. (Did you know he found the story and characters in The Stand were getting away from him, so he blew up the house in which most of them were meeting? The guy’s brutal.) It’s a fantastic method, and some authors obviously do quite well with it.

But it’s not my method. I’m a meticulous planner, and I like to know, more or less, where I’m going when I start the journey. The method that I’ve found works best for me—also a perfectly legitimate method used by numerous authors (Terry Brooks, to name one)—is somewhat the reverse: I tend to front-load the work in the sense that I take more time to sketch things ahead of time before starting in on my first draft.

First I need to decide on my general premise. It’s got to be something that excites me enough to want to spend an entire novel’s worth of time writing. This is both a “what if?” and a good answer. Then I sketch the main characters (who they are, where they came from, and where they’re going), create a “step sheet” that shows the flow of both character arcs and plot progression, and make a bunch of notes about the setting itself. All of this helps inform my writing so I can work in common themes, foreshadowing, and better set up character moments. (To continue with the metaphor from the first method, rather than taking a wild ride through the terrain, I get a satellite image.)

Then, finally, I actually write, using the step sheet and character sketches as a guide. This does NOT mean those things are inviolate. I might come up with new ideas as I go (and certain parts of my step sheet sometimes say “whatever seems to make sense for the characters at this point”), change directions, or even discover that the characters themselves have tapped me on the shoulder (or punched me in the face) to say they want to do things differently.

I hate when they punch me in the face. So far I haven’t had to kill anyone for that. (Okay, so actually I love when they punch me in the face. It’s great to see a character take on a life of his or her own. But sometimes those punches can put serious kinks in my plans! Jerks.) :D

So that gets me through the first draft. From there I edit, revise, agonize, improvise, exercise (it’s good to get the brain working, plus it rhymes here, which is my main reason for mentioning it) and probably eat some pizza.

Come to think of it, pizza (and caffeine) is also a very important part of the earlier steps, too.

So that’s my method. It works for me, but every writer is different. If anyone ever tries to tell you there’s only one “right” way to write a book, you kick them in the shins, and then do it again for me. (And then, ya know, run.) While there are a number of different things that must be done when writing a book, there are also a number of different ways to go about doing them.

Thanks for reading, everyone! Check out the result of my process (and hopefully get a few laughs in the bargain) in my comedic contemporary fantasy Zeus Is Dead: A Monstrously Inconvenient Adventure, in paperback and ebook formats from Booktrope Publishing!

***

There we go, folks – I’ll definitely be making time to give ‘Zeus is Dead’ a read, seems like it’ll be an enjoyable read! :-)

To connect with Michael, check him on Twitter and Facebook; order the novel from Amazon and Barnes & Noble, add the book on Goodreads, and check out his website for more information regarding him and his work.

Massive thanks to Vanya for her patience, and to Michael for the great guest-post! :-)

Happy reading and always Be EPIC!

 
 

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